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Energy and Environment Cabinet

Division of Water

Division of Water
Watershed Watch

  Four RiversTradewater, Lower GreenGreenSaltKentuckyLickingUpper CumberlandBig Sandy

 

 Announcements

 
  
  
​Governor Beshear announces $2.9 million federal grant awarded to prevent nonpoint source pollution. Watershed Watch in Kentucky: Volunteer Training Upgrades and Support awarded federal grant: $264,174. Nonfederal match: $176,116. More information

 

 

 Workshop Forms

 
document

 

 

 2013 Training Materials

 
Document
expand Phase : 1 - Calibrating Your Conductivity Meter ‎(2)
expand Phase : 1 - Program Logistics, Field Chemistry, and Grab Sample ‎(3)
expand Phase : 1 - Recertification ‎(1)
Document
collapse Phase : 2 - Biological and Habitat Assessments ‎(2)
 
 

 Chemical Safety Sheets

 
document
expand Category : Conductivity ‎(2)
expand Category : Dissolved Oxygen ‎(5)
expand Category : pH ‎(2)
expand Category : Sample Preservatives ‎(1)

In 1997, the Kentucky Division of Water launched its watershed management program. This program was a public outreach effort to promote the new watershed management plan and enlist volunteers to help in the assessment of the waterways in Kentucky. Since 1997, Watershed Watch in Kentucky has trained nearly 4,000 volunteers and currently has approximately 2,000 volunteers that continue to sample across the state. There are monitoring stations in Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia and Tennessee.

All of the Watershed Watch basins are non-profit and operate from individual grant funding. The Virginia Environmental Endowment has been a large supporter of Watershed Watch in Kentucky. They have provided grant funding to the organization since its conception in 1997.

Watershed Watch offers training to citizens interested in water quality. Volunteers are trained on how to take a qualified water sample that is analyzed by professional labs. They are also trained on how to perform basic water quality field data, consisting of dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature and conductivity. Volunteers can also be trained to perform biological and habitat assessments.

If you meet one of the qualifications listed below then please select the watershed you want to work with and sign up for training.  There are eight basins that participate in the Watershed Watch in Kentucky program. Click on the map to find the watershed watch basin in your areas.

We need your help if you:

  1. Live within five miles of one of our study streams.
  2. Have a strong love for science.
  3. Have a deep love for the waterways of your community and are willing to pitch in and work hard for their protection.
Kentucky Center of Excellence for Watershed Management (KCEWM), Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute (KWRRI), and Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) are supporters of Watershed Watch in Kentucky (WWKY). KGS serves as the data repository for all Watershed Watch data in Kentucky. KWRRI and KCEWM provide technical advice to WWKY and its volunteers on a variety of topics including collection and interpretation of water quality data.